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So how did it go at the Berlin Bike Show?

Preparing for this year’s Berliner Fahrradschau was a full on obstacle course. With the argon tank for TIG-welder and the lasercut sidecar mounts not arriving, it really pushed us to be creative to get everything ready in time. Luckily we are surrounded by excellent people, namely Jan and Arne, who borrowed us gear, so it was possible to start welding on Tuesday, to be ready by Thursday evening. And so, after working 12-13 hours every day, the sidecar and materials for the stand we’re ready, just minutes before our production area alarm is armed on Thursday evening. Unfortunately with no time to paint the sidecar.

The Sidecar Bike is almost welded
The Sidecar is welded, just needs the woodwork.

So we loaded everything on the car by 21:30, and after a quick sleep, we were ready to hit the road at 4:30 in the morning with my friend Birk. Roll your clocks some 6,5h forward and we’re unpacking at Station Berlin, the venue for 2016 Berliner Fahrradschau, only to discover that we had forgotten the smallest, yet one of the most important components of the Sidecar Bike – the bearings that connect the sidecar to the bike.

Packing the car for Berliner Fahrradschau 2016

With 1 hour to go before opening, I grab one of the show bikes and make my way to a tech shop. With no lock on me, I take the bike inside the shop and set it standing next to the counters. A very grumpy older lady-worker appears and takes the bike outside, I’m nervous about thieves, but I hope to be out of the store in 2 minutes, and take my chances. So I’m directed to the right department and waiting as the man over the counter speaks to a client about RC helicopter blades in a deeply disturbing pervert tone – oh well, at least I’ll get my stuff soon. Some anxious 5 minutes pass, I ask about the bearings and he tells me to look at a shelf, if it’s not there then they don’t have it. OK, Thanks for not checking your stock on the screen, they are not there. Out and gone I am, luckily the bike is there.

Googling for help, the only option is to hit up the store from the same chain, some 20 minutes by bike. I’m quite pissed off by the manners of the service person, but as I cycle and absorb more of Berlin, I start to feel more and more relaxed. Berlin has a really nice vibe and I decide to give it one more chance. On my way, I come up with a plan to ask a person on the street to mind my bike as I run to the store.

Berliner Fahrradschau Bike Show and Sidecar Bicycle
The Sidecar Bike is finally assembled at the show

I arrive by the shop, a man is just walking out the shop – ‘Can I ask your help, I’m here for a bike show and need something from this store. Do you have just 5 minutes to look after my bike? I don’t have a lock‘. After taking a moment to process English, the man says ‘Yes‘ with a nice smile. Faith in Berlin restored. Running in, I show a picture of what I need. I’m immediately directed to right department. I ask the person there, this time to be greeted in perfect English, he checks the computer, they 2 bearings in the back room. I’m out in about 7 minutes and after thanking the person outside, I make my way back to the show, 6 minutes after the doors opened..

I guess everyone is quite tired of reading by now, so we’ll post the part 2 about the actual show next week.

For all the new subscribers from Berlin: The lucky winner of Magnetic Lights is Katharina. Congratulations, we’ve send an email to you with details 🙂

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A week in the life of Olaf the Cyclist

As  the sun is rising higher and higher above the horizon, Olaf has become more and more busy. Between preparations for Berliner Fahrradschau in the land of bier, wurst and no-speedlimit horseways; taking moving-pictures for a new villagefunding campaign and production of goods, there has been very little time for sleep. But mythical as it may sound, under the label of labour of love, it has been a very enjoyable week indeed.

So what is Olaf making for the villagefunding campaign?

Villagefunding platform by the name of Kickstarter has been a huge help to Olaf’s business thusfar. After the first campaign, Olaf has been on a quest to design the perfect urban bicycle. He has been looking for the perfect balance between comfort, practicality, speed and personalization. After testing of different components since the end of the summer, Olaf is now happy with the setup. He won’t go into details just yet, but took a selfie to give a first glimpse:

Olaf-The-Cyclist-Selfie-KP-Cykler-Blog

What will be new for Berliner Fahrradschau?

After thorough tests of the bicycle-whale-carrier, Olaf has been perfecting production methods and equipment. He has prepared the tubing for a new version of the bicycle-whale-carrier with lovely laser cut frame attachments. The TIG type blacksmith machine still needs a barrel of Argon, and the new version will be ready next week. In addition Olaf has prepared a bunch of prototype elk-horn-antler-bike-rests that will be sold for quite a few gold coins fewer than the normal models.

Olaf-The-Cyclist-Whale-Transporter
Olaf and the bicycle-whale-carrier

So make sure you stop by Berliner Fahrradschau if you’re in Berlin between 18-20 of March.

There was also a day when Olaf managed to curb his enthusiasm for selfies and took pictures of the upgraded new elk-horn-antler-bike-rests. Upgrades include a chromed pipe vs previously painted pipe and a laser cut logo. Head over to our shop and treat yourself to a lovely storage solution for the new season: http://kpcyclery.com/

The Bike Hanger in black on a wall with a bicycle - KP Cykler

Lastly a pro tip from South Africa – get a fast bike or you’ll get run over by an ostrich.

 

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5 impressive Sidecar hauls

Ever since we finished the 1st Sidecar Bike prototype in mid-November 2015, we’ve been throwing everything at it to test its limits. Here are 5 different loads we’re most impressed about.

Sidevogn Cykel i Odense Havn

5. Groceries – perhaps it’s not as impressive as the rest, but it rightfully deserves a place in the list. You can probably relate to this one if you’re like 44% of Danish households and don’t have a car. The weekly grocery run can be quite annoying if non-motorized, especially if you end up buying something larger you didn’t plan. Carrying it on handlebars can be hassle, but throw it on a Sidecar and you’re not even thinking about it.

4. Ice hockey gear – us, hockey players, are known for having a crap-ton of armor. Without a car, it’s almost impossible to transport. But luckily a sidecar can easily handle one large bag, just make sure to strap it properly.

Sidecar Bike transporting ice hockey gear

3. Two sidecars – or rather the material for 2 more sidecars. I must say I was a bit nervous about loading the 2,7 meter long steel pipes and wooden planks on the Sidecar Bike. But the 4 km ride turned out to be smooth as a baby’s behind.

Sidecar Bike transporting 3 meter long pipes

2. Six frame sets – instead of taking the van, I thought of seeing how well the Sidecar Bike can handle a longer ride – 14,5 km one way to be precise. The climbs were a bit slow, and I admit that I got a bit pissed after chasing a group of roadies for a few kilometers without being able to catch them..

Sidecar Bike taking 6 bicycle frames to Otterup

1. My lovely fiancée – this one was more for fun than anything, but it does work. You can see her filming the ride on the following video:

 

From heavy to super long to super high, our Sidecar Bike has not fallen short with any cargo we’ve thrown at it. It has been far more valuable and versatile than we first imagined. As we produce all Sidecar Bikes in-house, it can be customized for practically any special cargo, but what would you use it for?

Our Sidecar Bike: http://kpcyclery.com/product/the-sidecar-bike-by-kp-cykler/

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The Bull’s Head aka How Pablo Picasso designed our Bike Hanger

Okay, we can’t really ‘employ’ Pablo Picasso – though we would love to. But we, a bike company, are surprisingly taking his heritage to more homes..

During the 2nd World War, Picasso’s style took a turn, the vivid colors were replaced with shades of brown and grey. The theme was turning ever morbid. Yet from the bleakest of times, comes a sudden demonstration of whit and unseen creativity – The Bull’s Head from 1942.

Pablo-Picasso-Bull's-Head-Bike-Hanger

It wasn’t a painting or a drawing, but a simple combination of handlebars and the seat of an old bicycle. It has been hailed as Picasso’s most striking and exciting works, and it inspired our Bike Hanger. The beautiful piece is not only practical in its efficiency to rest your precious bike’s wheels, but a striking piece of art. Many bike hangers have the unfortunate fate of looking unsightly when the bike is taken down, but with the lovely architectural taste of Picasso’s inspiring 20th century statue, you’ll be amazed at how it blends right in.

The-Bike-Hanger-KP-Cykler-Limited-Brown-2

The Bike Hanger is available in limited edition (50 pcs) and the regular production model. You have the choice of a fine black finish or a soothing brown theme, both of which give you a wide variety to fit your home’s color scheme. Picasso’s Bull’s Head was meant to inspire and be playful, which is exactly what the art of biking is. Add on to the adventure of a lifetime and allow your bike to relax in style.

The track handlebars are made of a gorgeous silver finish and the premium handlebar grip tape is a great, soft place for your weary bike to rest. As a reminder, only 50 of the limited editions will ever be made, so as the wise Picasso once said, “Action is the foundational key to all success.” Act now!

Pablo Picasso’s Bull’s Head is part of the permanent exhibition in Musée National Picasso-Paris: http://www.museepicassoparis.fr/

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The Legend of Olaf the Cyclist

Once upon a time in an Østerly land, a man of great power named Olaf the Cyclist was caught in a snow storm. Blinded by the blizzard, he could no longer see the way home after deer hunting. He tried to keep straight, hoping that if he doesn’t go in circles, he can reach safety, just as long as he keeps going, and keeps going straight ahead. But the storm wouldn’t calm, so this great man fell down in exhaustion, and was frozen in time.

Olaf-caught-in-snow

Many cold years passed, and Olaf the Cyclist remained frozen, until one day, the skies cleared, the oldest of flags, Dannebrog, fell from the heavens, and a big melt started. Olaf slowly melted with the snow, his lungs gasping for air. He had no idea what had happened, but he felt a time of change ahead of him. He picked up his bike and started pedaling and soon realized he was in a place he had never visited. The snow storm had taken him to a far away land.

Guided by the stars and the sun, he started going South. Soon he encountered first people. These people were not the people of Olaf the Cyclist, but people from another tribe. They even had different bicycles. Some of these people did not think much of Olaf’s bike, and compared it to a gutted fish with only the skeleton remaining, yet some of the people were curious. Olaf the Cyclist saw their curiosity and let them too try to ride this machine, locked in time.

Olaf-bike-like-fish

Olaf thought about going further South, but before getting back in the saddle he realized something – what if it is a sign. Perhaps this is an opportunity to build these slim, fish-like bicycles for the people of this land. He had heard good things about these new people and heard that these people like things that are made by hand, not by large windmills.

windmill

So Olaf the Cyclist got to work as he had always known that one day, he will love creating something valuable for other people. Soon, Olaf was creating more and more with his two hands and he wanted to share his lessons with others. He decided to put up a board in his village on which he would post messages every week. So he set to work, he organised topics on his friends, his goods, and about the cyclists of lands near and far. He put up the first letter, sharing how to set up a device on your bicycle to carry whales on dry land. The paper was very successful and many people stopped at the board and read what Olaf had written with a help of a poet from a land across the sea.

To make life easier, Olaf the Cyclist bought pigeons to deliver messages to the board readers, so that whenever there is a new paper up on the board, people would get reminded and would not have to walk the board every day. Showing great respect to everyone who signed up for pigeon mail, Olaf will give away a set of Magnetic Lights to those subscribed.

We will give a way a set of CPH Magnetic Lights in the end of the month to all blog subscribers. Sign up for our blog updates on the right. Includes free shipping World-Wide.
We will give away one set of Magnetic Lights in the end of the month to one lucky blog subscriber. Sign up for our blog updates on the right (bottom of the page on mobiles). Includes free shipping World-Wide.
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1st Post

KP-Cykler-First-Blog-Post

Our good fans of KP Cykler,

We are happy to tell you that we’re opening a blog on our site. We will be posting 2 posts a week on the following subjects:

  • Bicycle Geekery – design, building, and maintenance principles. From sidecar geometry to avoiding punctures.
  • Bike Culture – note-worthy developments in the bike world.
  • KP Cykler Daily – no, we will not be posting daily – the word daily refers to our everyday happenings at KP Cykler. You can expect new product development updates, news from events we’re attending, and other everyday updates.
  • KP Cykler Friends – here we will introduce our most interesting friends around the world who are contributing to the world of bicycles.

We hope you will find our writings interesting – please let us know if there is something specific you would like to read about. Subscribe to the blog on the right receive notifications as soon as something fresh has landed.

Much love,

Kaspar