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How to choose a cargo bike

Nighthawk cargo in action

There’s a myriad of cargo bikes out there. Each has its own purpose and a user alike, How to choose the right cargo bike for you?

Why are cargo bikes getting more and more popular?

Cargo bikes have been around for about a century. This is a fact that many are eager to dismiss – so why is it that it seems like a modern-day invention, where were the cargo bikes a couple of decades ago? The answer seems to lie largely in the legislation of different countries and also the shift in mindset. After reading It’s all about the bike by Robert Penn (highly recommended read) over the Corona lockdown, I can’t help but agree that the bike was a strange thing to use as a practical means of transport in many countries from about 1960s to 2000. Robert’s example in the book illustrates this well – he talks about living in Wales where you only commuted on a bike if you had lost your driver’s license. He describes going to a pub on a bike, a bloke pulled him aside and asked what he had done to lose his driving license, he replied he just likes cycling better. A year later the bloke pulls him aside again – did you kill someone with your car that you still don’t have your license? If regular exercise and commuting on a bicycle were seen like this, how odd would a cargo bike have been..? Luckily we are coming out of this tunnel from the other end, people want to keep happy, live healthy for longer, be environmentally friendly by traveling less distance without petrol and in the end saving money by ditching the car or public transport subscription.

Long John

Kaspar riding Nighthawk Cargo
Nighthawk Cargo

The first and perhaps most popular type is the Long John type cargo bike. This type of a bicycle was first invented in Odense, Denmark (oddly enough, that’s where we first started) in 1923 by the Smith & Co Company (known today as SCO). Long Johns are best for people who like to have a fast, nimble, and stylish cargo bike. The cargo area is relatively aerodynamic and since it’s in front of the bicycle, it’s perfect for not only hauling packages but also children as they are visible and easy to communicate with. Depending on a manufacturer’s geometry, riding this bike can feel like riding a normal bike or take a couple of hours to get used to it. Since it’s as narrow as a regular two-wheeled bike, a Longjohn is perfect for countries with not-so-many proper bike lanes.

Trike

Family riding Trike
Trike / Bakfiets / Kastenfahrrad

Probably the second most popular cargo bike type is a tricycle with 2 front wheels and a box in-between, also known as Trike / Bakfiets / Kastenfahrrad. This version of a cargo bike is often the choice for families when both parents share a bike as it’s more easily adjustable to fit a smaller and larger rider by only rising or lowering the seat. The handlebars stay in the same place as they are attached to the box. Another consideration is the number of children. Three or more children usually don’t fit into the front of a Longjohn. The down-side is that these bikes are usually slow, when steering the handlebars move away from the rider and at slightly higher speeds they will feel like tipping over because they don’t tilt.

Long Tail

Long tail cargo bike
Long tail cargo bike

A bike that’s not so popular in Europe, but seems to be no.1 choice of cargo bike in the US is a Long Tail cargo bike. Also a two-wheeler, this bike has effectively an elongated rack in the back. The ’rack’ itself is a part of the bike frame, making it rigid. The strength of this bike lies in its dimensions – frame as narrow as a regular bike and only slightly longer. This makes it easy to store the bike and to carry it up and down the stairs. However of course the cargo ability is not comparable to the forementioned bikes. It is easy to sit up to two kids on the back with child seats, but everything else like a school bag would need to be held by the child or somehow strapped to the frame. When hauling any other type of cargo, it needs to be in a bag, again strapped to the frame with no possibility of ’just tossing it on there’.

Sidecar

Bike with a sidecar
Promotional sidecar bike in action

Lastly, if you want to stand out, then there are options like a sidecar. They are relatively uncommon, but you wouldn’t believe the number of looks we have gotten in Copenhagen when riding this thing around. Every day, someone would pull up on the side and say ’Hey, wow… A sidecar… I’ve never seen one before… That’s super cool!’ With slightly less cargo space than Long Johns or Trikes, this option is perhaps not as practical, but it turns heads like nothing else. And when allowed to tilt, it feels like a normal bike, only a bit wider. However, carrying children is not safe because of the proximity of the wheels on either side.

Electric or not

I had been skeptical about e-bikes for years, but I love them now. For years I have been riding fixed gear, single-speed, road, and sidecar bikes, and loved it. But after commuting more than 10 km one way every day, in the evenings I felt like not wanting to commute much more, perhaps needing to take a third shower too. With an eBike I estimate that my yearly mileage has grown by 30-40% just because I never need to think whether I want to ’go there’ on a bike, I just do it because it’s just as fast and convenient as a car. So if you aim to live car-free, sweat-free 5000+ km per year everyday life then yes, go electric.

So how to choose the right cargo bike

Firstly, if you’re even considering a cargo bike, you’re already doing the best thing possible for your health, the city you live in and the environment in general – cheers to this! Next, think about what you plan to do with the bike – daily length of the commute, how hilly or windy is your region, what will you carry.

Choose Trike if: commute is up to 5 km / 3 miles one way and the road is not too hilly/windy and not too bumpy. Or if you need to carry 3 or more children, speed is not an issue and you want to share the bike with your partner.

Choose Long Tail if: your only cargo is a bag that can be strapped to the frame or a child on a child seat.

Choose Sidecar if: you want to stand out or advertise your business and you do not need to carry children.

Choose Long John if: you want a bike that feels like a normal bike and goes fast with enough cargo space for 2 children and space to spare.

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Sunday read – 6 + 1 Easy Steps to Prep Your Bike for Spring

Cyclist on a white fixed gear bike in Denmark, Odense

March is here and it’s time to get your bicycle out and give it some love before taking it back on the road. This bike spring maintenance guide has some easy doable steps for anyone who wants to prep their bike for the next season.

1. Brakes

Vintage brown metallic rusty bicycle by Kp Cyclery

Check if your brakes are in good condition – tighten the cables if needed. Simply roll the bike back and forth and press the brakes. If the lever comes closer to the handlebars than you would like then use the tightening barrel by the lever or by the brakes to tighten the cable. Once you’re happy with the adjustment, don’t forget to tighten the locking ring.

2. Bike chain

In the beginning of a new season, replacing a chain is almost a must. If you’re not super geeky about maintenance and don’t ride every day then once a year can be perfectly okay interval for changing a chain, and what better time to do it than in the spring when you’re brushing off the dust anyway. So before getting the bike out, pop by a bike store and get yourself a new chain, or if don’t have the tool to break the chain then simply get it replaced at a shop. Most shops will be happy to do it without scheduling a time beforehand.

3. Bike lights

Magnetic lights by CPH Parts – find them here

Bike lights are useless if the batteries are dead or they are not blinking bright enough. Check if they are still fit to protect you in the next season. We have some good magnetic lights in the KP Cyclery webstore if you’re looking for a change. They attach to any steel frame and turn on once attached, shut down once removed.

4. Handlebar tape or grips

Light blue urban bike with brown leather brooks handle bar tape
Brooks leather handlebar tape on our KP Cyclery bicycle in Laguna Blue

Check the condition of your handlebar tape. If it is leather perhaps it needs a touch up with some leather grease or you are in the mood for an entirely new tape. Either way now is the good time to decide and order the one that will cheer you up for the season to come. Brooks is a good choice for a classic look. For a super funky look, you might want to check out the stuff BTP bartape has. As far as grips go, I really personally like the foamy model called Feather by Prologo on my Nighthawk cargo bike.

5. Saddle

Tightening Brooks B17 saddle
Use Brooks saddle key to tighten stretched saddle. Quarter of a turn at a time, tighten until you reach desired tension.

Leather saddles need maintenance once per year. Spring is the perfect time to wax your precious saddle with some bee’s wax (or any other good quality natural leather wax) and tighten it. Find ways to do it in our Leather Saddle Maintenance & Care guide posted earlier on our blog. If your saddle is non-leather, then check if its cover material is still intact and there are no cracks.

6. Tyres

Have a good look at your tyres, pump some air into them (you will find the required pressure on the wall of the tyre) and make sure they’re not punctured. A good idea is to do this a couple of days before you go riding for the first time as you might otherwise have a slow puncture and get stranded half way through the first ride of the season.

7. Bonus point – don’t get ripped off

If you’ve gone through the steps above then you shouldn’t really need professional help. Your bike is good to go. Of course a shop might tell you to come in every year for an expensive maintenance, but in reality, bikes have evolved a lot over the past decade. Only 10-15 years ago, almost all the bikes had loose bearing in the hubs and bottom brackets. These days all quality bikes will have sealed bearing, so there is really no need, or rather no way to take them apart, clean & lubricate them. So don’t get fooled by the much over-rated maintenance myth 🙂

Happy cycling!

Man and Woman walking with their bikes in the park

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DIY Cargo Bike – Part 2

Continuing where we left off, we will start with the more fun part of welding on the cargo bed area. If you missed the first part you can find it here.

Welding the cargo bed.

Like mentioned before. The bike’s geometry is made from points, what comes between them is only aesthetical. So this part was quite fun as everything that mattered had been aligned and locked into position. The only thing you need to worry about here is that you have enough space for pedals and the front wheel.
DIY cargo long john

New steerer, fork modifications.

After this step, you will notice the progress stopped. The frame was left unfinished for almost a year before having time to continue. As a next step, all the excess was cut off, and the head tube [guide to frame tubes] shortened. Also, the fork got modified to fit 20″ wheel as originally it was meant for 700c wheel, and disc brake mounts added. It’s important to check that you don’t make the fork too short or too long, so the cargo area will be parallel to the ground. Now I finally also cut away the extra parts of the down tube and fitted a new steering tube. I went for A-head stem for this. This bike was an experiment and I didn’t want to spend time and money ordering specialized fancy tubing. So I found some precision tubing that fits the stem and the headset from Onninen. It is quite heavy with 2 mm walls, but as I knew I would make it an e-bike, the weight was not too big of an issue. Improvements for next time: Go for Chromoly steerer and head tube to save some weight. Order early in the process.
DIY Cargo Bike

Outsourcing lasered parts.

Now you could do this on your own, but I saved a lot of time and also made things look nice by ordering some of the parts laser-cut like fork dropouts, steerer end, bearing holders for steering arm, etc. You can find my DXF files here if you find them useful.

The finishing touches.

At this stage, I bolted on a bottom bracket, cranks, an old chain, and went for a test ride. Everything felt nice, so the only thing left was to weld on last tubes, disc brake mounts (you can find mine under the above link), cable holders, kickstand, and then it was time for the paint shop.
DIY Bullitt cargo bike

Assembly day!

After everything arrived from powder coating, it was finally the time to assemble everything. All went smoothly and the bike was in one piece in no time.

 
 
 
 
 
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HOUSTON, WE HAVE A PROBLEM! (and cure)

Early testing revealed some flaws I had described in the last post about handling. After hitting 30 km/h the bike almost always got hit by speed wobble. With this problem, the bike would be rendered useless. Luckily I didn’t get discouraged as even the guys at Larry vs Harry also seem to have a problem with this, and the cure is to add a steering damper like the one used on motorcycles. I ordered one and attached it to the bike, and..    ..it solved the problem for a while before it broke down and leaked all the oil out after just 600 km on the bike. Then winter came along and I left the bike unused until this spring. After talking to some other frame builders I heard that this problem was common, many of them had also been fitting their bikes with steering dampers. The problem seems to be that the front end just gets too light as the problem is less evident with cargo on the bike. Anyway – I set to work early spring and made new damper fittings that would increase the working range of the damper. Having now done 500 km at speeds of 35 – 60 km/h without any steering wobble it seems that the bike is finally finished. Improvements for next time: a.) Design your bike with steering damper in mind from the beginning. b.) Keep shallow fork angle, short fork rake, and thus a large amount trail. This may improve stability if you want to resist using a steering damper.
DIY Cargobike KP CYCLERY

To summarize, this project turned out a lot better than I had anticipated. Before setting to work, my mind was set at 50/50 chance that the bike would work as well as it does. The Bafang 750w electric unit works well, the geometry is working with the steering damper, there is plenty of cargo space and it goes as fast as you wish. The mileage speaks for itself – currently, I’m averaging 150-200 km per week and only use the car for a short ride once a week to keep the brakes from sticking, etc. So if you have some welding skills and you’re thinking about building yourself a cargo bike- GO FOR IT! Also as a side note, we are constructing a jig to weld some more frames, so you will soon be able to order a proper cargo bike frame from us 🙂

And here it is – doing 45 km/h:

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DIY Cargo Bike – Part 1

KP Cyclery’s DIY cargo bike anyone with an angle grinder, old steel bike and welding machine can make without any special tools.

Firstly a disclaimer. As this bike was a personal experiment then I didn’t use the regular amount of planning and modelling. Many methods would not be used to make a proper product and currently I’m constructing a jig to hold everything in place when making this kind of bikes in the future.

With that cleared away, let’s dive into this DIY Cargo Bike project. It was started 2,5 years ago and I finished the bike roughly 8 months ago. I wanted a long john type cargo bike when we decided to move to Estonia, as there will not be a luxury of so many cycle paths. So already when still in Copenhagen I started the project.

The geometry.

Something that irritates me a little when people see my bike is they say – oh did you make a Bullitt replica. In part that is true. But also true is that long john type cargo bikes were used a hundred years ago, so you shouldn’t be afraid to make something similar. Of course most of the geometry should be similar to an existing bike that has been tested and sold with success. So you can use a lot of the geometry here: http://larryvsharry.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/technical_wireframe_bg1.png
Improvements for next time: a) Plan as much ahead as possible. If you have access to 3D CAD program then use it. Model everything, check that nothing collides when steering, etc. Get the geometry right – I find 69-degree headtube, 20 mm rake and thus 77 mm trail best for our bikes.

Chopping an old bike into pieces. Welding a new down tube.

I knew I wanted to do as little work as possible, so I found an old bike, dissembled everything and started cutting away. After cutting away the down tube I took a long 2-meter tube I wanted to use for the new down tube. Then I aligned it to the middle of the fork and welded to the bottom bracket. It is important to keep the fork on the bike at this point as I was not using a jig and needed some reference points. Keeping the new down tube long would also be giving me reference points for later alignment of the new fork. Before welding, I made sure the seat tube and new down tube were parallel by bolting both the welding table. PS! If tubing sizes are different then you need to use something for distance under the frame tubes if the frame is of smaller tubes. 

Improvements for next time: a) I would consider building a jig even for 1 piece. b) If not then I would run another tube under the down tube to align the new down tube with the rear axle center. c) I would make the down tube from round tubing as it will have some rotational stress.
DIY cargo bike

Welding on a new top tube.

Now I cut off the steering tube and cut the old top tube shorter, using it as a guide for the new top-tube alignment. This way I could make sure the new steerer would end up in the middle of the bike. Had I used a men’s frame I would have probably kept the original top tube. Note: keep the guiding tubes on the frame as long as you can. They help against heat distortion from welding.

Improvements for next time: a) Make this from round tubing for more resistance to rotational forces/torque.
DIY Long John Bike

 Welding on the new head tube.

Now this one was the biggest mistake and can also be for you, so pay attention and read improvements. Steerer position will affect the whole handling. So what I did correctly was to make sure the head tube is in position before welding the cargo bed. All the tubing in between the bottom bracket and head tube can be misaligned without a problem – if the head tube, rear triangle and the bottom bracket are located correctly. So using the 2 meters long new down tube, I could be quite confident that the middle of the front hub would be in the correct position. But getting the fork exactly straight in relation to the frame is more tricky. I used an extra piece of tubing and welded it to the new down tube. The other end was bolted to the fork.
DIY cargo bike 5
Now I didn’t double-check the alignment properly here. I would strongly suggest using an inclinometer here. Or at least a spirit level to make sure the seat tube and head tube are aligned. Next comes the head tube angle. You need to make sure you have a proper amount of trail to keep the steering stable. I didn’t pay enough attention to this and ended up with almost half the trail of a Bullitt (more about trail and steering here). 

Improvements for next time: a) After setting up the fork take a photo of the frame as best as you can from the side. On your computer open the photo with an image editing program and calculate the head tube angle or just compare it to this blueprint of a Bullitt. b) I would buy an inclinometer from the web to check all angles. They are quite inexpensive, starting from 10€ on the web.
DIY Cargo Bike Trail

The Problem.

I mentioned the steering will be where you can make the biggest mistake. What I ended up with is speed wobble when running over bumps at speeds over 30 km/h. Science is not exactly sure why it happens. In my case, I think it is a small trail combined with slightly misaligned front and back wheel and square tubing for top tube and down tube which make the frame flexible sideways. What I did to compensate is that I added a motorcycle steering damper. This worked, but I want to experiment further. This year I will cut the fork again and try to increase the trail. I will post an update later this year whether this worked. I believe Bullitt also has trouble with high-speed steering stability as they also now have a steering damper for as an extra option. Improvements for next time: a) Experimenting further has shown that enough trail fixes this issue. I went for a 77 mm trail (road bikes have around 55 mm) and now it is really stable.

To be continued.. Part 2

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Sunday read: Brooks Leather Saddle Maintenance & Care

Leather saddles have a ton of advantages over synthetic materials – they adjust to your anatomy, they get more comfortable with time, and if maintained well, they last forever and only look better with time. At the same time, if not looked after at all they might start cracking and lose their colour and character. Looking around Copenhagen shows you both ends of this line, the beauties and the beasts. No-one does leather saddles better than Brooks, so we will share 4 easy steps of leather saddle care to make your saddle last a lifetime.

  1. Give it some grease

    Even if you keep your bike indoors, never ride in the rain and only wear velvet pants, leather will have its natural wear. The saddle on the picture is a 1-year old B17 that I’ve ridden in all sorts of weather almost daily. As you see, it is starting to look like someone rubbed a sandpaper over the edges, this is to be expected. Easy medication against it is to take a piece of (clean) cloth and some leather fat. Brooks tells you to only use their saddle polish, but anything will do as long as it is natural and doesn’t have chemicals in it. Personally I would suggest bee’s wax, you can use it for saddle, grips, shoes, handbags etc.

    Leather fat for Brooks Saddle maintenance
    Natural leather fat by Gold Quality

    1-year old Brown B17 Brooks Saddle
    A year old Brooks Saddle with signs of wear.

    Brown Brooks B17 saddle care and maintenance
    Same saddle after a layer of natural leather fat. Rub it on, let it sit and rub excess fat off with a clean piece of cloth.
  2. Cover from rain

    Leather is not a huge fan of water. Just have a plastic bag in your backpack or under the seat for when it rains, pull it over the seat and keep your saddle in order and your rear end dry.

  3. Keep your bike indoors

    This one is not a must, but a rule of thumb is that your bike will last longer the less sun and rain it receives. The Bike Hanger is the perfect solution for bike storage on the wall if you have small spaces or you just want it to be out of the way in the corridor or garage. If you don’t want to keep it indoors then cover the seat with a plastic bag during the night so it won’t soak in the rain.

    White bike hanging on the wall with The Bike Hanger by KP Cyclery
    The Bike Hanger 2.0 in brown stores this bicycle in style
  4. Tighten your seat every once in a while

    In most cases, it will be needed only once a year, but still, it is a good idea to do it. All Brooks saddles come with a special key to tighten them as leather stretches. If you’re not sure when to do it then jump into the closest bike shop and they should give you a good idea and probably do it for you. NB! Don’t tighten a wet saddle!

    Tightening Brown Brooks B17 saddle
    Use Brooks saddle key to tighten stretched saddle. Quarter of a turn at a time, tighten until you reach desired tension.

And that’s as easy as it is. Our leather saddle care regime probably takes less than an hour of work a year. It will keep your Brooks leather saddle looking good for ages, and who knows, maybe one day you’ll sell it on eBay for a nice dime.

*We’re happy to do the above steps for you for free in our Copenhagen shop 😉

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Leaning Sidecars

It’s been a little while since the last post – we’re looking to get back into it now as we’ve successfully moved the shop to our new location in Copenhagen (Ingerslevsgade 103, Kbh 1705 if you’re curious to stop by ;) ). Here’s a piece on something that’s been cooking for a while – leaning sidecar history.

Leaning sidecars were first invented by Freddie Dixon, an English motorbike racer, way back in the 1920’s. Dixon was the first to figure out that by having the sidecar passenger control the tilt of the car with a lever, instead of the sidecar being rigidly fixed to the bike, it was possible to take turns a lot faster, and he used this idea to great success in his motorbike racing career. Leaning sidecars were further popularized in the same decade in American motorcycle racing, although now the focus was on having the sidecar wheel tilt by itself, giving the bike rider control. The technology used in these tilting sidecars has come a long way, and we have now been able to come up with our very own leaning sidecar for a bicycle, allowing you to easily carry goods around without knocking the bike itself off balance.

Leaning motorcycle sidecar

Leaning sidecars have many advantages which they can bring to your bike-riding, that make them an excellent choice for anyone who wants to be able to carry things on their bike with ease. With a leaning sidecar, riding the bike feels normal, and you aren’t constrained by having to compensate for the added weight of the sidecar. You’re able to take corners as you normally would, leaning in and taking them faster, as the sidecar is able to tilt freely to match the curve of the corner. Furthermore, since the sidecar is able to move independently, you don’t have to worry about holes in the road knocking you off balance – the sidecar can move over these without affecting the stability of the bike itself. On a three wheeled bike, you might notice that the bike rocks around when moving over holes, but this is not a problem with a leaning sidecar.

At KP Cyclery, we’ve specifically designed our leaning sidecar bike to match the demand springing up for more efficient, effective bikes. With more and more households choosing not to have a car, it makes sense to enable your bike to carry goods such as groceries home easily. You’re sure to be impressed with how much weight it can cope with – in testing, we even managed to fit an armchair onto it!

Sidecar Bicycle by KP Cyclery from above
Our version of the leaning sidecar

Stylish and functional, this bike makes a great choice for those who want to cut through urban congestion with ease, and carry goods around safe in the knowledge that they are still doing their bit for the environment. The only constraint on what you can ferry around is your imagination, so you’re sure to find that it adapts to your particular needs perfectly. If you have good balance, and hang on tight, you can even fit a person on it, so it really is suitable for everyone. We look forward to seeing what you can do with yours!

**Rasmus K, if you’re reading this and haven’t checked you inbox, then do so, you just won a set of magnetic lights.

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Why steel is still the king of frame tubing?

Steel is the material that has been on an irreplaceable position throughout the history of cycling. From the boneshakers of 1860s to modern custom builds, it has been the material of choice for many builders.

KP Cykler Boneshaker Animation

From the early 1900s to 1990s, steel was almost the only material used in producing bikes. In 1990s aluminium began its rise as the top choice in racing, only to be dethroned as the end of the decade saw a new material’s rise – carbon fiber. Composite materials have large advantages over metal such as aerodynamics, as it can be easily formed into any shape, and most importantly for racing – weight. Carbon road racing frames have been built as light as 642 grams with a ‘light’ steel frame being around 1400g. With carbon conquering most of the professional cycling, steel is not very likely to make a comeback to the performance world.

But if dreaming of the fastest time on Alpe d’Huez doesn’t give you a boner, then steel is most probably the best option for your urban bicycle. Sure the stiff aluminium gets you up the hill fast, but it also makes for a depressingly bumpy ride on most streets. Get into a crash on a carbon frame, and you better have a plastic bag with you to pick up the pieces – try to google shattered carbon bike frame. Steel frames give you a nice smooth ride on most city street with its lovely little flex. If you get into a crash, it will stay in one unit and hopefully still giving you a chance to guide your bike, or get to your destination once you get back up.

A shattered carbon fiber fork.

These are the exact reasons why at KP Cykler, we love steel  frames – their design is beautifully simple, they age gracefully, and they give you the most comfortable ride for the best possible price, what’s there not to like..?

KP Cykler bicycle 21

The lightest bike in the World: http://www.bikeradar.com/road/gear/article/the-worlds-lightest-bike-36902/

History of the bicycle: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_bicycle

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Sidecar Bike – How does it work?

A sidecar bike is a great way of extending the capabilities of your bicycle. By having a sidecar, you can easily transport cargo that is simply too large for panniers and racks. But have you ever wondered how a sidecar bike works? It seems like a miracle that it is able to stay attached without causing the bike to tip over. However, there are two simple methods which are used to keep everything balanced- sidecar lead, and toe-in. In this article, we’ll explain just how a sidecar bike works, so you won’t be left wondering anymore.

KP Cykler sidecar bike

The “sidecar lead” refers to the horizontal distance between the rear wheel of the bike, and the rear wheel of the sidecar. The greater this distance, the less of a risk there is of the bike and sidecar tipping over. However, a bigger sidecar lead will also cause the sidecar’s tires to wear out more quickly, so it’s important to get the sidecar lead just right.

KP Cykler Sidecar Bike Lead

The other way that a sidecar bike stays balanced is known as “toe in”. The weight of the sidecar means that the bike will be constantly pulled towards it- something that could pose a big problem if it isn’t dealt with. To counteract this, the sidecar will typically be tilted slightly towards the bike itself. The bigger the sidecar, the more toe in is required, both due to the increased weight and because of the wind resistance that could knock the bike off balance.

KP Cykler Sidecar Bike Toe In

As you can see, it requires a lot of skill to get the balance just right. We’ve worked hard to ensure that every measurement on our sidecar bikes is just right, so that you can be sure of a safe journey, every time.

Motorcycle sidecar setup: http://www.steves-workshop.co.uk/vehicles/bmw/sidecar/sidecaradjustment/sidecaradjustment.html

Our Sidecar Bike: http://kpcyclery.com/product/the-sidecar-bike-by-kp-cykler/